Cinematography Techniques, on set not in post. What a concept.

Behind the Scenes: Three Cinematography Techniques For Creating a High-End Beauty Video

Great article and video from over at fstoppers.com. I’ve seen stuff like this done before on sets, but never been a huge fan of doing things in production that I know I can duplicate in post, especially with the proliferation of lens flares and other flashy whiz-bangs that tend to get over used to the point of cliche in this visual medium. But it is nice to see it explained and illustrated in this way, and of course there are instances were it just makes sense to do things in production, and not aways have to “fix it in post” right? So go ahead, make those lens flares on set. Put things in front of the lens to create blurs and vignettes. Just remember that “effect” is baked in to the shot, and at that point, it can’t be “fixed in post.”

Early version of a project, finished version coming soon.


This is one that I’ve posted photos of here for the last year or so. I’ve been shooting for this project since April 2016, finally wrapping up this February 2017. It’s been a great shooting challenge that has combined drones, GoPro, and the Sony A7s. Lots of time lapse, both locked down and motion controlled with the ever amazing Syrp Genie. Cannot recommend that piece of gear enough. I could say a lot about the Sony A7s as well, but there’s plenty of material out there already. In brief, my take on it is that it’s a pretty amazing camera, and meets my needs exceedingly well. It’s not for everyone, or every shooting scenario, but then no camera meets those standards. One thing I am very glad to have added to the investment is the Tilta cage. Could not imagine shooting without it. Like a case for ones iPhone, it gives this rather small camera some much needed heft and protection.

Post production begins very soon on the final, full version for the customer, which will be a promotional and sales tool for his website.

The Annual “Drive To Work in a Snow Storm” Time Lapse!

Well, here it is once again, the dead of winter in Northeast Wisconsin. What better thing to do when crawling along in the morning commute to work in a blizzard but set up the GoPro on the dashboard set to time lapse mode, and off you go. The trip normally takes between 45-50 minutes, in weather like this, more like an hour and fifteen. Oh well. There’s a lot of good tutorials out there for how to shoot time lapse with a GoPro. I had mine set to one frame every two seconds. Two or five usually works just fine. As usual for my workflow, time lapse images were processed in Adobe After Effects, color and sound done in Adobe Premiere Pro, both CC 2017 (for those nerds out there that actually care about that stuff). Hope you enjoy! Unless this kind of stuff gives you nervous twitches, then, well… what can I say?

Gear updates…


Got some fascinating new items for the A7s to round out the kit. A Tilta cage with plenty of mounting holes for future needs, and a Kamerar follow focus system. Pretty impressed with how solid all this stuff is and really looking forward to some upcoming shoots to put it through its paces. 

A shot of the office today. 


I’ll be shooting here for some time on and off as the place gets built. The promo for the builder will consist of time lapse, aerial and regular video. It’s been a lot of fun with all the challenging setups and figuring out time lapse frame rates. 

Cameras are the Sony A7s and a GoPro. 

Drone First Flight

Had some fun over the past few weeks getting used to flying a DJI Phantom 3 Pro. This is not for commercial purposes at this time as I do not have a pilots license of any sort, but am getting used to just how this tool works and what some of its high and low points are (pun intended). I can only say, there is an massive learning curve, not to the part of simply getting the thing airborne, but to the control factor for making good images and camera moves. It’s actually ridiculously easy to get the thing in the air, assuming you follow the few simple instructions, but once one starts moving it around and attempting slightly more than basic camera moves with it, that seems to be when all neurons need to be firing in top form. It’s at that point when multiple things with the controls and where ones eyes need to be start to demand attention.

 

 

I know, I’m behind the curve on this drone thing. I know, EVERYONE and their little nephew has a drone and has their own tech news training channel up on youtube already. I’m fine being behind the curve. And I’m also fine taking my time to make sure I learn how to use it and not be one of the multitude of casualties that has crashed the drone into water, people, trees, buildings, etc. So stay tuned, hopefully I’ll be able to post more shorts like this over the coming weeks and months. One thing is for sure, this is one darn fun activity, and no wonder its shot through the roof (pun intended, again) in popularity amongst hobbyists and professionals.

Have one? Chime in, I’d love to hear your thoughts on getting started, how you use it, etc.